Unbuttoned

jodie wingham

Year:

2016

Media:

screen print on aluminium, stainless steel

Size (cm):

183 cm x 122 cm x 30cm

London 2018

Other works

Untitled (Intimacy)

jodie wingham

Year:

2016

Media:

dye sublimation on aluminium

Size (cm):

4 cm x 4 cm x 2 cm

London 2018

Sitting crossed legged

jodie wingham

Year:

2016

Media:

screen print on acrylic, mdf plinth

Size (cm):

183 cm x 122 cm x 20 cm

London 2018

Biography

Jodie Wingham (Born 1991) Birmingham, UK is a contemporary printmaker who lives and works in the West Midlands. A recent graduate from the Birmingham School of Art her work focuses on the act of looking using traditional printing techniques with not so traditional methods of display. Emerging from psychoanalytic theories the work centers around the enjoyment we as individuals find in the actual act of viewing. Often depicting the spaces where we shouldn’t look into we glimpse moments through distorted views, a shadow in a room or a fleeting glimpse of an event that takes place within private interiors.

Artist statement

Jodie Wingham combines printmaking with non traditional methods of display to create artworks that playfully distort images, where images are turned into sculptural forms. Inspired by the act of observing others and the audiences’ enjoyment of this process she focuses on the viewers desire to look and gain information, using imagery with voyeuristic tendencies, where private moments are captured of people unaware they are being observed.
Themes surrounding the pleasure taken by human beings in the act of ‘looking’ underpin the work on display, what satisfaction we receive when an image is presented to us that reveals something not usually seen, a glimpse into the hidden. This can take the form of an open button on a man’s shirt in Unbuttoned or the embrace of a couple seen in the pieces included in Untitled (Intimacy) both creating conversations surrounding intimacy not just between the people within the work but between the viewer and the work. Playing with our desire to understand the information provided within an image or in this case missing from the images on display there is a greater need required from the audience to fill in the gaps, interpret a narrative within the image in order to explore the act of looking and the roles of viewer and ‘voyeur’ in the work. Allowing a freedom to stare however, through the methods and materials used in the works creation this isn't as easy as you'd hope. She offers the audience the opportunity to fill in the gaps, interpret a narrative within the image in order to explore the act of looking and the roles of viewer and ‘voyeur’ in her work.