The Same Way a Light Sound

Pablo Vindel

Year:

2016

Media:

Slumped glass, adhesive, graphite, hair, and painted high-density conglomerate wood

Size (cm):

83 x 253 x 153

London 2018

Other works

Mouths

Pablo Vindel

Year:

2015

Media:

Clear blown glass

Size (cm):

Pieces perfectly fit into two related oral cavities. x Pieces perfectly fit into two related oral cavities. x Pieces perfectly fit into two related oral cavities.

London 2018

Flores

Pablo Vindel

Year:

2015

Media:

Parchment sewn by hand with silk thread. Video-performance.

Size (cm):

Variable dimensions x Variable dimensions x Variable dimensions

London 2018

Biography

Pablo Vindel (Spain, 1990) is a visual artist and a writer. Multilingual, individual and foreign, he embraces and explores mythologies of displacement, resilience and translation. Vindel holds an MFA in Studio from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2016) and a BFA from the Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain (2014). He has lived and studied internationally at the San Francisco Art Institute and the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris. Vindel has completed residencies in Lisbon, Santiago (Chile), Kumarakom (India), San Francisco, Valencia (Spain), and Istanbul. His work has been exhibited widely and internationally in Europe, Asia and the States. He lives and works in Barcelona.

Pablo Vindel has been selected 2017 Fellow at the Creative Glass Center of America, Museum of American Glass.

Artist statement

As a multilingual artist and writer my practice navigates permeable spaces between familiar and foreign fabrications: aphorisms of public mistrust and centrifugal forces, of fragmentation and ontological integrity, of ‘actuality’ and the figment of translation. Currently, I explore these themes through the intersection of parafiction and handcrafted sculptural bodies of slumped and blown glass.

Clear glass unravels truth and calls forth topographies of the broken. I am drawn to the contained language present in fissure—and so I dissect, hammer, break and reformulate large surfaces of float material. Then I anneal the pieces in a manner similar to terra cotta: the furnace adapted to each composition and the glass fired to expand, curl or collapse while resting on previously manufactured molds. Later, I work these forms: cutting, perforating, gluing and suturing. Multiple iterations allow assertions of compensation. Hair insinuates itself, lacing together a cantankerous arrangement, pierced and fragmented, unlocking capacities that transcend the physical boundaries of the medium.

Whereas slumped glass and cold working relate to trauma inflicted upon the material and its fragility, when blowing glass I operate in closer relationship with translation as cultural phenomena. In order to be molded molten matter must remain in constant motion, an object of translation fluidly moving from one state to another. Blown glass is not so much substance as state of being, able to transform quickly and back and forth: from hot to cold, igneous force to tepid ember or frozen phantom. Permutable and elastic, it suggests infinite translations, while simultaneously indicating both its own untranslatability and the depth of its suggestiveness.
A practice that complicates transparency invites new voices to hint at their presence, new surfaces to unwind and provoke. Reimagined forms of the transparent offer up previously unseen visions, ways and histories; implicate transforming latent spaces of the material world and esoteric manifestations in the immaterial and literary. They embody strains of revolution and transmutation that underlie all myth, alchemy, science, as they speak of original orders and systems not yet classified.

This object-oriented ontology and the inquiry into a multi-layered phenomenology come together in the encounter of object and person. A scenario proposes itself: shattered and elongated bodies become place for appreciation and shift. No vision imposed, only space for listening to how material responds to artistic gesture, how glass memorializes and reinterprets that which is near and far, becoming one and true reflector of the relevance of global experience.