Carry On - San Sebastian

Anne Cecile Surga

Year:

2017

Media:

Carrara Marble & Wood

Size (cm):

45 x 30 x 85

London 2018

Other works

Black Hole III

Anne Cecile Surga

Year:

2016

Media:

French Marble

Size (cm):

35 x 25 x 15

London 2018

You Just Learn to Live With It

Anne Cecile Surga

Year:

2017

Media:

Carrara Marble

Size (cm):

28 x 19 x 3.5

London 2018

Biography

Anne Cecile was born in 1987 in Lavelanet, France. Early on, she demonstrated a natural interest in art and attended classical art classes as a child. This first classical study of art would be the foundation for the artistic development to come.
She graduated with a Master in Business Administration in 2010, and with a Master in Art History in 2013. Because of her exposure to a multitude of aesthetics and cultures, Anne Cecile is inclined to develop a universal artistic style: a style that aims to be understandable by most people, an art that speak directly to the heart of the viewer.
In 2013 Anne Cecile stayed at the Fundacion Pablo Atchugarry where she learnt how to cut marble. Following this experience marble becomes her favorite material, but she will keep on creating with other material such as papier mache, plaster, and steel. In 2015, she decides to entirely dedicate her life to her artistic practice and open her studio in the Pyrenean Mountains in France, integrating French marble to her practice while keeping on working on Carrara marble.

Artist statement

Through my art practice, I aim at exploring the values inherent to human nature. I am extremely interested in the question of the definition of the self and how much the social context in which we evolve is responsible in shaping our own image. As a woman artist, I am slightly more focused on defining women’s identity. The current consumption society sends out tones of messages to every human, thus influencing how we see ourselves and how we want to define ourselves. I am interested in how human continue to be true to their core in this society despite the daily violence thrown at us. I have a classical approach to art and figuration and therefore I have always integrated beauty as an important aspect of my artworks.

I believe there is a psychological triangle between who we really are, what society tells us to be, and the image of ourselves we decide to project onto society. I often use myths as base upon which I add a modern interpretation, thus allowing an easy first read of the work but also bringing a discussion. I like to create different levels of interpretation in my works, thus giving keys to the viewer to understand the subject I address without offering one single interpretation of the artwork. Each artwork becomes public as soon as it is offered to the viewer eyes, and I leave it to the viewer to construct his or her own understanding of what is in front of him. I have an intimate approach: I put the emotion forward in my artworks, the feelings and sensations are more important than the formal aspect. This is also a personal way to connect with the public; I bring the private into the public space.