Gods nature

Marc Brousse

Year:

2016

Media:

Ink and Charcoal on paper

Size (cm):

85 x 85 x -

London 2019
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Other works

Fragment III

Marc Brousse

Year:

2018

Media:

Ink an charcoal on paper

Size (cm):

30 x 20 x -

London 2019

Urban archive

Marc Brousse

Year:

2018

Media:

Ink and charcoal on paper

Size (cm):

20 x 30 x -

London 2019

Biography

Born in 1984 in France, I started my artistic path parallel to my profession as an architect. After 10 years abroad, I am currently living in Bordeaux.
I have been influenced by artists such as François Schuiten with his ability to generate cities with intriguing architecture, M.C. Escher with his work on curved and cylindrical perspectives, DeChirico with its meta-physic principles and his ability to recondition our time-thinking and Giovanni Battista Piranesi with his pictorial and fictitious representations of Rome.
« la vie d’un trait tiré »
Throughout my art and architectural research, I develop traitillism principles expressing the infinity complexity and contradiction principles in architecture,
For me the line symbolizes life, space, thought and memory. I capture Nature’s rhythm to represent a specific vision of space and the world. I rhythm, put a sequence on lines, vary its thickness to generate urban matrix at different scales levels. This technique enables the viewer to change its way of thinking on cities and spatial configuration.
Each artwork is drawn freehand to the naked eye, with ink and charcoal on paper or canvas lin.
I aim to represent the intimate relation linking Nature and Architecture, toward epigenetic principles.

Project

“Gazing the crossroads of civilizations”

The project will represent a collection of urban and architectural artefacts written by humankind.
The founding principles of civilizations arise from urban cultures nourished by symbols, beliefs and utopias engraving identity references and generating the memory of places. Moreover, the fundamental values of our environment such as architecture and the nature city are a social relation and unification vector.
Since ancient times, utopian architectures have been dreamed (ATOPOS) expressing an escape from history. Since Ezekiel and Babylon, Homere and the Champs Elysees to the Utopian Island of Thomas More, visions of timeless cities have been illustrated compiling a moral vision of the world.
Through a dialogue between the architecture of man and nature, the artworks will question the position of man within the city as a global, abstract and even elusive identity. This position is equivalent to the 3 periods / attitudes defined by Zygmunt Bauman:
• Pre-modern: utopia of the game warden, defendant of the natural balance.
• Modern: gardener wanting to organize his space, submitting nature to an order he decides
• Contemporary: utopia of the hunter who kills until his carnier is full. The flight forward that does not fear deregulation

This line of thinking integrates the statement that cultural and architectural development follows Epigenetic principles that says that development is the outcome of underlying rules plus specific sensitivity to the environment. Every city is a unique « species » in the sense that its juxtaposition of buildings and spaces constitute the epigenetic program for that place. Epigenesis - as a developmental principle – statues that buildings do not merely echo the existing milieu but add something new and dynamic to the city.
The room will be organized as a Panhellenic sanctuary where civilizations gathered their architectural knowledge. Each artwork (ink on paper) is set in a group of three suspended parchments (50x50 to 150x50cm) forming seven elements in a circle, seven being the symbol of achievement and eternal life.

The artworks will express the analytical approaches at different scales: a gradual reduction in the size of urban artefacts to the limit of the infinitely small (theoretically illustrating the notion of infinite quantity.
The parchments will represent civilizations from all continents from Antiquity to Nowadays (Egyptian, Minoan, Greek, Ancient Rome, Mesopotamia, Pre-Columbian, Arabic, Byzantine, etc.).
Obelisk sculptures and engraved stones spread across the room like forgotten fragments will reinforce the sanctuary atmosphere.
To have a complete immersion for the observer, there will be a musical artwork like Janet Cardiff’s Forty Part Motet.
When the observer enters the room, a magnifying glass and a glass sphere will be at his/her disposal enabling him/her to observe the artworks from different points of views.
In conclusion, the observer will interact with architectural utopias where the boundaries become permeable enabling the appearance of one and the same world. The project opens a window on harmony, defined by order ascendant over complexity; or unity within multiplicity ; or incorporating dissonance but synchrony outweights conflict.