The Landscape of Paper

Kuniko Maeda

Year:

2016

Media:

Paper , Lasercut

Size (cm):

30cm (each piece) x 20cm (each piece) x 10cm (each piece)

London 2018

Other works

Elosion

Kuniko Maeda

Year:

2017

Media:

Paper , Laser cut

Size (cm):

25cm x 50cm x 40cm

London 2018

Elosion-2

Kuniko Maeda

Year:

2017

Media:

Paper, Laser cut

Size (cm):

25cm x 60cm x 60cm

London 2018

Biography

I am a Japanese artist based in London, who was born in Singapore and grew up in Germany. The background influenced me to have broader visions and interests of cultural diversity. I studied Japanese traditional wood carving in Kyoto, where I grew my interests in natural materials and handcraft technique. After the course I decided to develop my practice and gained my MA Textile Design at the Chelsea College of Arts, London and MA Fine Art at Middlesex University. My works which take the form of undefined, twisting the shapes in space question ideas of consumption and the value we place on everyday commodity, using a combination of classical technique and modern technology such as laser cutting, which played a significant part in my artwork.

Artist statement

My approach to Art has been to explore the connections between nature and humans through the use of specific materials such as paper, fabric and leather.
By exploring the possibility of materials and their unique properties, I allow the materials to speak and embrace abstraction.

I relate to my personal experiences and background to develop my research. I work with paper, often recycled, partly because of its many common uses, easy availability and its an unappreciated nature. Paper has an adaptability and elasticity which is enhanced by laser cut patterned structures of the paper from which the sculptural forms are made. It can therefore reshape in obscure and abstract ways.

I have focused in sculptural works which I see as a realigning with nature. Paper initiates it’s journey from natural sources like trees. My choice therefore is to reconnect our material consumption back into nature. The shapes I created are inspired by nature such as the sun, the moon, mountains and rivers, plants, animals and human beings.
I try to keep an experimental approach to each work with an ease and simplicity. I found quite inspiring during this process to become familiar with the works by, Richard Deacon and Anthony Gormley, Antony Caro, Tony Craig. Gormley's own writings resonates with this approach:

“Art is a basic human need, a basic human activity, it is what makes us human and offers us the tools to become ourselves. In a time when we are mad by the lure of false desires and the promise of objects of consumption, art can be a free and open space of experiment and experience.” (Anthony Gormley on Sculpture, by Mark Holborn, Thames and Hudson, 2015).

I believe my work development is essential to guide me where I go next. It keeps informing me where to look at, where to take inspiration from and what’s the next step. I find great motivation in researching and reading about historical artists along aside the studio practise. Where I always return my observations taken from daily experiences and learning journey.