A Throw of the Dice

Julia Marco Campmany

Year:

2017

Media:

Screen Print

Size (cm):

152 x 102 x 0.3

London 2019
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Other works

The Voyage

Julia Marco Campmany

Year:

2017

Media:

Screen Print

Size (cm):

152 x 102 x 0.3

London 2019

Northern Walk

Julia Marco Campmany

Year:

2014

Media:

Lithograph

Size (cm):

76 x 56 x 0.2

London 2019

Biography

Julia Marco-Campmany is a Spanish-born artist based in London. She is a compulsive drawer and dedicated printmaker, working in particular with screen printing and lithography.
Her practice revolves around the links between walking, drawing, and automatism. Collecting her emotional response to the environment she is immersed in, her work results on an accumulation of lived moments, of sensations articulated in intimate maps. The action of the hand on the paper mimics her free wanders on the urban landscape. Her imagery consists on powerful lines and strokes, gestural and abstract compositions.
Julia Marco-Campmany studied her BA and Ma in Fine Arts in the Polytechnic University, in Valencia, and a second MA, in Printmaking, at the Royal College of Art. She has deepened her printmaking sills at Tamarind Institute, in New Mexico.
She has exhibited her work internationally, highlighting the National Original Printmaking Exhibition, in Bankside Gallery, the Printmaking Postgraduate in Clifford Chance, and the Awagami Printmaking Exhibition in Japan. She has also taken part in different printmaking fairs such as Woolwich Printmaking Fair and the Open Portfolio at FIG Bilbao. Her work is kept in various collections such as UPV Valencia, Royal College of Aart, Center for the International Printed Image (CIEC in Spanish), and the Akademia Sztuk Pięknych.
She has also been awarded with an artist residency in Newcastle, the Print Futures Awards, and the High Commendation in the XV Printmaking Prize José Caballero (Madrid).

Project

My work ties together drawing and walking as key elements informing my work. Both activities are responsive to a preconfigured space. I am interested in the point where restriction meets intuitive response. For me, this is intrinsically linked to perambulating: when I draw on the delimited surface of the paper, and when I walk on the preconfigured urban landscape, the decisions are made rapidly, intuitively, even automatically. I claim this automatism as a poetic insurgency: the unpredictable comes into place.
I am interested in this automatism, and in the meditative mindset that abstraction has to offer. The balance of power between the dynamic shapes I draw and the space they populate, their disintegration, connexions, gesture and strength across the surface guides the viewer eye and mind. My practice translates these strolls with an abstract, gestural and intimate language. It is rooted in the language of printmaking. The axis of my investigation is the idea that the paper is not a fixed surface but rather a versatile space for action. My prints invoke floating objects, demarcated areas, guiding lines and intimate maps that, in fact, suggests the uncertainty of matter and image. Shapes that travel across the limited space of the paper, as if looking at a single section from a larger map.
From the frenetic city environment to the meticulous observation of still life, my work results of the observation of the world around us, perceived through walks and hikes. Walking and pausing are acts that are not in line with the rush of our time. I vindicate the pause and the look as conscious and committed action. Walking even in the hectic environment of the city. Walking as a modus operandi.
Paul Klee defined drawing as ‘taking a line for a walk’. This is a description I can relate to. Indeed, the sensations I collect walking are organized in abstract paths of sensations on paper. I attempt to gather this constant research process, filling notebooks and papers as a diary capturing the journey, escaping the transcendent logic of the finished piece. These series are not intended as an accumulation of conclusions but as an invitation to a changing world of infinite possibilities.
Walking is the right speed to understand, and drawing is the right speed to tell.

Julia Marco Campmany