Captive

Alan Glenn Ibbitson

Year:

2015

Media:

oil on canvas

Size (cm):

62 x 62 x 3

London 2018
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Other works

Balancing Act

Alan Glenn Ibbitson

Year:

2012

Media:

acrylic and oil on canvas

Size (cm):

122 x 122 x 3

London 2018

Artist Interrupted; portrait of Rozanne Hawksley

Alan Glenn Ibbitson

Year:

2014 -2017

Media:

mixed; [oil, copper wire, iron, feathers]

Size (cm):

112 x 91 x 4

London 2018

Biography

After completing a routine art education to degree level Glenn became a part-time teacher in the life room at Harrogate College of Art in 1984 -86.
In 1988-91, he trained as a scenic artist at BBC Television Centre. He completed his training six months early and by August 1989 had led a departmental team of five artists to their share in a Design BAFTA for ‘Portrait of a Marriage’. This time provided opportunities to practice trompe-l’oeil techniques and visual trickery on an industrial scale; liaising with the Special Effects department to produce glass-shots and C.S.O. overlay matte paintings, and providing storyboards for designers.
In 1991 he went freelance, briefly forming a company, ‘Scenic Artists’, before going solo to specialise in Arts programmes for television.
In 2004, he moved to West Wales to concentrate on his own artwork. He extended his art practice into film-making, producing in 2013 ‘Tatsuko’, a 44 minute silent feature shot in black and white in tribute to the Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu, following two centrally funded trips to Japan. These visits prompted him to revisit his early interest in comic strips, producing two graphic novels,.’Nemesis’ is a meditation on menace and paranoia, and ‘Eclipse’ referenced the treatment of the homeless in Japan.
His films have been shown in Europe, Brazil, Japan and Australia, while his artworks are in private collections across six continents

Artist statement

The central focus of my art is the human figure, painted in a representational idiom and based on careful direct observation. This observational discipline is grafted to a strong sense of narrative and concept.
My visual repertory, spanning a wide range of media [painting, printmaking, collage, video, graphic novels], can be traced back to my career as a scenic artist for film, television and theatre where mastery of a range of artistic styles and shorthands was essential. In the spirit of art as a deception, I incorporate these tactics of [mis]representation to produce a visual discord in my own work; to blur of the line between the genuine and the fraudulent, reality and illusion.
Though I hope that my work can be appreciated on a surface level for its formal values, there is usually a socio-political subtext to be found underlying the work, should my audience seek it.
The ‘Consignment ‘project I worked on for over six years, was a response to human trafficking and extraordinary rendition. The circus performers and their entourage in ‘Smoke and Mirrors’ enabled me to investigate political spin, social disenfranchisement ecological concerns and gender role-assignment. The graphic novel “Eclipse” was inspired by homelessness and the bureaucratic responses it has provoked in Japan.

Ibbitson

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