Soup Pile

Hoyle Ceramics

Year:

2017

Media:

Bone China

Size (cm):

5 x 21 x 21

London 2019
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Jug Confusion

Hoyle Ceramics

Year:

2017

Media:

Porcelain, earthenware and stoneware

Size (cm):

23 x 16 x 11

London 2019

Dribble

Hoyle Ceramics

Year:

2017

Media:

Porcelain

Size (cm):

19 x 27 x 27

London 2019

Biography

Liverpool Art School, Hope Street, 1998.

‘Number 68’ and The Hahnemann Building proudly stand amongst the tall Georgian dwellings of Liverpool’s wealthy merchant past and is where Rachel took up art as her choice of career direction. The early inspiration taken from these grand architectural surroundings is the basis for her historical and architectural interests and the genesis that is rooted in her ceramics. This short but productive year on the art foundation course was followed by a bachelor’s degree in Three-Dimensional Design in Manchester, where she realised her love for installation art. Ten years of teaching art and design in further education and the completion of a PGCE, led her full circle back to her studies to complete a masters in Ceramic Design at Staffordshire.

Having graduated as a Master of Arts with distinction she is working towards her vision of Hoyle Ceramics and supports her practice with Clay School teaching for The British Ceramics Biennial in Stoke-on-Trent schools and part time lecturing at Staffordshire University.

Rachel’s work has developed into a union of cultures and design ethics; bringing together the beauty of design-led aesthetics with industry-led and studio pottery-led techniques.

Project

Hoyle ceramics fuses art with craft. The inspirations of heritage, culture and the people are recorded through loose illustrations with pen, ink and clay to produce functional, decorative ceramics. Slip casting moulds are developed from thrown originals, lending studio pottery qualities to the work, and conveying evidence of the maker’s hand. The pieces often utilize the three-dimensional surface as a canvas which depict statement abstract and figurative marks on a subtly textured surface, completed with a cool pallet and punctuated with a dash of vivid colour or decadent glamour.

Rachel’s work represents the combined heritage of two cultures. The heritage architecture of her native Liverpool and industrial pottery techniques from her resident city of Stoke on Trent is the prominent theme that is present in the ceramic pieces she creates.

Her work celebrates the techniques of traditional studio pottery (throwing and hand building) and industrial pottery (plaster lathing, mould-making and slip casting) bringing the two together fusing shape and surface illustrations to produce, by hand, beautiful ceramic art and tableware pieces to cherish that evoke an emotional response.

The ARTROOMS vision is that the room will look like an interior magazine shoot, showcasing collections of ceramic tableware and decorative objects, in my style, made using the slip casting method. Originals are thrown, hand carved and then used to make plaster moulds. Some of the production moulds will be exhibited as artworks in themselves; exhibiting signs of past industrial processes and the studio process by which many of the finished objects are made. Small pieces of working studio memorabilia will be used also as display props. The collections will be complemented by select interior accessories and fabrics to complete the overall atmosphere of the space.

Collections may include some or all of the following:
A tea/coffee tray with cups, saucers, cream/milk jug, sugar, coffee/teapot and cutlery, placed on a bedside table.
A breakfast set including bowl, plate, milk jug, mug, toast rack, juice beaker and cutlery, placed on a tray on the bed.
A dining set including soup bowl, dinner plate, side plate, pudding bowl, wine glass, water beaker and cutlery, on a table or trolley.
A large decorative feature piece on a table/sideboard.
A collection of jugs on a table/sideboard/plinth.
Ceramic lamp stands with shade on each bedside table.
Next to a chair, a small hand-made ceramic table with decadent gold detail, with a whisky glass placed down; perhaps with its partner glass and decanter on a sideboard.
Vases of flowers.
Some of the installations will show excessive amounts of objects piled high or clustered, displaying the repetitive nature of the casting process. Signature drawings of the city and people will adorn some of the ceramics and the walls.

Hoyle Ceramics

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