The Cat Kingdom

Beth Horner

Year:

2017

Media:

Acrylic paint on board

Size (cm):

25 x 40 x 2

London 2018

Other works

Homegrown

Beth Horner

Year:

2017

Media:

Acrylic paint on board

Size (cm):

40 x 60 x 2

London 2018

Studio

Beth Horner

Year:

2017

Media:

Acrylic paint on board

Size (cm):

30 x 20 x 2

London 2018

Biography

Beth Horner, b. 1995, Hitchin, UK, lives and works between London and Hertfordshire. She completed a 'Foundation Diploma in Art and Design' at Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London, in 2014. Beth then went on to received her BA in 'Fine Art: Painting' from Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts London, in 2017. Her work has been included in exhibitions throughout London.

Artist statement

My work is rooted in suburbia through the domestic environments and kitsch elements that crop up. I employ collage both physically and digitally, using discarded, often low quality images that I have taken with my phone, or sourced from the depths of my personal digital devices. These autobiographical images are compiled together and reconstructed to give them a new context and narrative.

I am interested in a push and pull between the virtual and the physical – exploring ideas around simulated paint – and also experiencing the outside, inside. I explore the framework within a painting with reference to digital interfaces. Compositions generated on Photoshop are translated into analogue form using both painterly techniques and screen-printing to describe different kinds of spaces, surface qualities and picture planes. In person, the paintings deceive a viewer into understanding the picture as digital, and when viewed digitally, the images pretend to be made of paint.

Other digitally constructed images are physically manipulated with the addition of paint, found materials and surfaces, and an archive of printed imagery. Throughout the making process, the paint itself becomes a form of censorship; mimicking the fill tool of Photoshop it unites, cements and conceals the environment, detaching the images from their sources and burying specifications of place. Perceptions of paint and pixel and day and night are challenged, as surfaces shift and merge together like overlaying screens.