Last Farewell I

Kaori Homma

Year:

2017

Media:

Aburidashi / Fire Etching/ Fire, Acid and Water on Paper

Size (cm):

35 x 42 x 5

London 2018

Other works

Web III

Kaori Homma

Year:

2016

Media:

Aburidashi/ Fire Etching/ Fire, Acid and Water on Paper

Size (cm):

38 x 55 x 5

London 2018

Silent summer without cicada’s cry

Kaori Homma

Year:

2015

Media:

Aburidashi/ Fire Etching/ Fire Acid and Water on Paper

Size (cm):

42 x 50 x 5

London 2018

Biography

Born in Japan. After gaining BA in Fine Art Tokyo University of Art and Design, Homma moved to UK and gained MA in Fine Art Sculpture Chelsea School of Art. She is based in London and exhibiting internationally. He works are seen in major institutions including Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, Discerning Eyes, Thread Needle Exhibition, while also featured in more cutting edge alternative projects.
She has won numbers of International Awards, including Aqua Zero Award, in Spain, International Drawing Competition in Hungary and Sir Halley Stewart Trust Research Award,
Homma is also a co-founder of Art Action UK , Coordinator of Brockley Open Studios. Homma is an Associate Lecturer at CSM, and CCW at University of Arts London, and invited as a speaker at various international conferences in Art and Social Changes. She has also published articles on AN magazine, ArtWay EU and Novelty. Her works are also featured on Timeout, Guardian, Art Maze and many other Japanese papers and magazines. in 2017 Homma has been awarded a bursary by AN Magazine to visit Venice Biennale during its opening week.

Artist statement

The images seen in my work are etched by fire, not by a pigment sitting on a surface. A technique normally associated with secret correspondence used in the past, called “aburi-dashi” in Japanese. Invisible Ink made with lemon juice is used to render images, slightly altering the delicate balance of paper, once exposed to the heat images are burnt into paper as an integral part of its structure. The resulting image contains a level of fragility and notion of death within it by nature. In my work the connotation of transience associated with the methodology is important as it highlights a position at the opposite end of spectrum from the monumentalism, even though the actual physicality of the work endures. The importance of the notion of ephemeral has been acutely felt through the 2011 Fukushima Nuclear disaster which was triggered by earthquake and tsunami. It has highlighted a environmental landscape on the brink of a catastrophic paradigm change, and the fragility of our existence on this planet.