Artefact Aftermath

Elliot Walker

Year:

2017

Media:

Glass

Size (cm):

100 x 120 x 100

London 2019
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Other works

Domestic Balance

Elliot Walker

Year:

2018

Media:

Glass

Size (cm):

80 x 120 x 80

London 2019

Crystal Repast

Elliot Walker

Year:

2017

Media:

Glass

Size (cm):

67 x 62 x 54

London 2019

Biography

Elliot Started his career as an artist while studying for a psychology Degree in 2007, where he had the unusual hobby of creating stained glass windows.
Elliot started his career as an artist during his university years where he had a unusual hobby for a Psychology Student, creating stained glass windows.
“I had a short of path in my room that lead from the door to the bed, leading through my grinding and cutting station and past piles of sheet glass, whole and shards. I don't think my house mates knew what to make of it all...”
Upon completing his psychology degree Elliot decided to dedicate himself to his vocation and begin his training in all aspects of Glass making and design.
Elliot graduated from a Masters degree in the Midlands (the heart of glass making in the UK) in 2013 and is now recognised as one of the UK's most talented young glass artists.

Project

A developing theme in my work is the exploration of the 'post event’, and the uninhabited space we leave behind.
Though not didactic in nature, this sculpture investigates my fear and distrust of nuclear power and its possible disastrous consequences, something that can be viewed as the epitome of our inexorable modernisation and evolution as a species.
What will be the repercussions on having opened Pandora’s box? on our food, our environment and our genetic future?
The use of Uranium glass in these works is an important choice as it references the vitrification and crystallisation of materials at sites of great calamity, such as Fulgurite structures formed when lightning strikes sand. This transformation of organic material into something 'other' has informed my practise for a number of years as has the preservative nature of this sudden change of state, such as the premature fossilisation of Pompeii or the encapsulation of lifeforms in tree sap.
There is a fascinating beauty in disaster.