"Desert Tableau"

Eden McDowell

Year:

2017

Media:

plywood, roofing metal, 2X4, pigment

Size (cm):

243.84 x 152.4 x 121.92

London 2019
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Other works

Installation view: "Totem", "Relic", "Soft Arc"

Eden McDowell

Year:

2017

Media:

found objects, cinder blocks, masonite, ceiling tile, gold leaf, 2 X 4, corrugated foam, steel

Size (cm):

274.32 x 213.36 x 274.32

London 2019

"To Tie Down a Sunset (Preparation for Cold)"

Eden McDowell

Year:

2016

Media:

found objects, cinder blocks, vinyl, rope, tree, fire wood, pigment

Size (cm):

396.24 x 182.88 x 182.88

London 2019

Biography

Eden McDowell is an installation and object based sculptor living and working in Northampton, Massachusetts. She received her BFA in sculpture from the Maine College of Art in the Spring of 2017. She is a 2018 awardee of the St. Boltoph Club Foundation's Emerging Artist Grant for sculpture and has recently shown her work at the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition in Brooklyn, NY, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Portland, Maine, and the Gal_lery, a non-profit gallery space in Manchester, New Hampshire. She was selected to curate among the 2017 Thesis Curatorial Team at Maine College of Art and has been granted with an honorable mention from the 2017 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award from the International Sculpture Center.
Her sculptural practice currently resides within the creative atmosphere of the river valley. Finding inspiration from the quotidian details of life among rural and industrial landscapes, McDowell harvests her surroundings into a sculptural context that evokes structure, feminism, and domestic influence.

Project

What intrigues me as a sculptress is an art that revives the power of simulation. Confronted with the accumulated ruins of our predecessors, with what some say is a conglomeration of spent ideas and dead ends, a contemporary sculpture can only enliven artistic phantoms through the recovery of the old and the stripping of its grandeur through bare form. This is an ethical decision. By rejecting pomp, accumulation, and precious materials, the naked structures become a celebration of the mundane; they turn into poetic simulacra. So far, most of my artwork encompasses the relationship between human and form—the anthropomorphic behaviors applied to inanimate objects, and their adhered connotations. I intend to continue my artistic trajectory with work exploring the interconnection between simulation and women in art through the medium of sculpture.
For this specific project, the full hotel room serves as a stage for object manipulation. Between the preexisting items of the room and the inclusion of sculpturally simulated objects, I wish to create an atmosphere of domestic mimicry and architectural celebration. Using industrial materials such as blue tarp, cinder blocks, PVC pipe, and rigid foam, I will recreate items of furniture and domestic accessories from memory. The sculptural additions will form a dialogue with what already exists architecturally—a sort of synergy of impersonation and reflection revealed. My interpretation of structure is guided by feminism, yet not labeled as. It’s about reinventing forms inherent to the masculine realm with a feminine and honest approach.