Stone Rock Steel

Charlotte barlas

Year:

2017

Media:

Stone, Rock and Steel

Size (cm):

243 x 270 x 290

London 2018

Other works

Steel Stone

Charlotte barlas

Year:

2016

Media:

stone and steel

Size (cm):

100 x 90 x 95

London 2018

steeled

Charlotte barlas

Year:

2016

Media:

steel

Size (cm):

243 x 170 x 190

London 2018

Biography

This practice draws its sculptural energy from a love of and thorough engagement with the countryside and a desire to echo this through sculpture. Through an ongoing process of engrossing oneself in the outdoors, a more informed understanding of the sculptural form of environment is achieved. This relationship with the environment was formed as a young child, from being always outdoors and finding comfort from it. The move to University proved to have been a struggle to begin with having always lived in the countryside and previously only spent small amounts of time in the city. It became apparent once living in the city that breaks to return to the countryside, escaping from the overwhelming city life were needed to retain and embellishment an artistic drive.

Through engagement with the environment that energy transposes through the sculptures. The desire if got the viewer to be able to tap into that energy pulled from the environment in a subjective encounter of it. Currently temporality is a main focus, such as time, light, weather and horizontal sections which I am playing with in my sculpture in order the engage the viewer in depth.

Artist statement

The foundation of my practice comes from a thorough engagement with the natural
environment and a desire to emulate this through sculpture.

Using my senses, I immerse myself in the landscape phenomenologically.
For example, when in the country side I notice how natural conditions such as the wind
or rain affect my awareness of the landscape and then reflect upon such phenomenon in
the studio.
Such temporal factors of the environment will alter my awareness of it, revealing a
refreshing truth about its being. It is such natural condition I encounter in the
countryside which excite me and drive my practice. I represent through sculpture the
energy I take from being in the countryside and the natural truths I uncover about its
being. It is essential for me to revisit the country whenever I can in order to keep my
artistic drive strong.
In my sculptures I have used naturally sourced materials. The stones and rocks are
unquestionable organic and I have combined them with steel and copper which are still
sourced from the earth before a chemically refining industrial process. I have allowed in
Stone Rock Steel and Coppered Stone Rock my steel and copper to weather to remind the
viewer off their earthly origin. This also enables the viewer to witness the natural

conditions acting upon them and experiencing them with it. By this I have left my
copper out oxidize and my steel out to rust.
Both of my sculptures are outdoor pieces as they are enhanced by the viewer being able
to witness the natural conditions changing my sculptures and their experience of them.
Being outside my sculptures have a far less restrictive setting and are allowed to morph
back into the landscape but also makes one more aware of the environment. Both
sculptures are heavily interactive enforcing a continuous dialogue with the viewer
allowing he or she to become aware its formal structure effected by the outdoor
environment through it corporeal effect. In Stone Rock Steel one becomes very aware of
the space that it sculpts, as navigating and noticing it changing shape as you move in
and around it.
The balanced stones and rocks in both sculptures are placed in such a formation that
they appear as if they might fall contrasted by some that appear very stable. This alludes
to the way the stones and rocks fall from the rock bed. The sense that they might tumble
adds to the viewer’s awareness of them engulfed by the fact they could collapse on
them. This contrasts to the harmonious fragility of their balance, the beautiful colours
within them, against the stable formal structure in Stone Rock Steel and the formal floor
arrangement of Coppered Stone Rock.