Storyteller – Hans Christian Andersen –

Atsushi Fukunaga

Year:

ongoing

Media:

Glass, mirror, frame, vinyl film, wire

Size (cm):

dimensions variable / 22pieces x - x -

London 2019
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Storyteller – Hans Christian Andersen –

Atsushi Fukunaga

Year:

Ongoing

Media:

Glass, mirror, frame, vinyl film, wire

Size (cm):

dimensions variable / 22pieces x - x -

London 2019

Storyteller – Hans Christian Andersen –

Atsushi Fukunaga

Year:

Ongoing

Media:

Glass, mirror, frame, vinyl film, wire

Size (cm):

dimensions variable / 22pieces x - x -

London 2019

Biography

Fukuanaga was born in Hiroshima in 1980. He is based in Berlin since 2006.
He has won numerous awards including the jury selections at the 17th Japan Media Arts Festival and selected artist at Asahi Art Square Open Square Project 2013, among others.

Project

I engage with the theme of language and my works involve the participation of others. In many cases, participants are left to their own creations, which become part of my own work’s source. In recent years, I have been employing onomatopoeia, the linguistic expression that imitates sound, as the central theme of works in my practice. The French word onomatopée comes from the ancient Greek word ὀνοµατοποιία, connoting the “creation of words” and I believe that anyone can participate in such a creation process. The purpose of my activities is to bring out the latent potential within participants to create “sounds” with their own language, and in order to get the maximum result, I often leave the process of imitating sounds to the participants.


Storyteller – Hans Christian Andersen –

Fairy Tales and Stories written by Hans Christian Andersen have been translated all over the world, widely known from children to adults. Although the original is Dutch, the sceneries imagined by the readers as many as the translated languages are diverse.
His works are almost his own original, but folklore and children’s stories passed down in writing or orally, and have been collected from various countries and locals for folklore and linguistics research.
By leaving the “creation of words,” said to be the origin of the word onomatopoeia, to speakers of various languages, the silent stories are dramatized by their sounds. The illusionary appearance of the mirrors are layered with the notion of the mirror, which brings to mind virtual images, emphasizing the invisible nature of sound that cannot be seen in reality.

Reference: Original Text / English Translation: H. P. Paull (1872)