Back and Forth I

Haider Ali Akmal

Year:

2011

Media:

Digital Print on Archival Paper

Size (cm):

122 x 68 x 0

London 2018

Other works

The triumph of these tired eyes

Haider Ali Akmal

Year:

2017

Media:

Graphic and Charcoal on Archival Paper

Size (cm):

97 x 64 x 0

London 2018

Nostalgia Disturbia II

Haider Ali Akmal

Year:

2013

Media:

Phototransfer on Archival Paper

Size (cm):

28 x 43 x 0

London 2018

Biography

Haider is primarily a Printmaker with a BFA from NCA Lahore, but also a Design Futurist and Researcher with a Masters from Lancaster University UK. He’s currently undergoing a PhD Studentship at Lancaster in Design Fiction a branch of literature, film, and speculative design.

Asides from having worked as a Lecturer of Fine Arts, and Design at NCA Lahore and BNU respectively, Haider has been exhibiting his work as a visual artist both locally and internationally since 2008, With a keen interest in the overlaps in design, art, and empathy, his work stems from his experiences with culture and associated notions of intimacy. The version of nostalgia that he entertains in his work comes from an idea of being away from oneself, relating to a mental and physical state of partition

Artist statement

My work over the years has been about the relationship one has with their pasts. We collect moments from our experiences sometimes in the form of trinkets sometimes as mere images in our heads or on pieces of paper. What fascinates me the most is the power these items have on our memories, one slight move and you’re transported years away. Elaborate reenactments of days long gone, in our heads they morph and change into other versions of realities over time; with everything we’ve experienced since affecting them. Was the dress red or blue? Was it ’86 or ’85? The details poke at you and fester over time to the point of annoyance. Why can’t you remember something that obviously held so much importance, is what we tend to ask. But was it really important?

The sensational power that our memories inflict on us at the moment of resurrection is nothing short of a fallacy if we’ve managed to mutate them over time; they are but experiences fermented over time. Hiding behind the beauty of our intimate moments we keep them as treasures, an obsession of hording memories. Perhaps to empathise with ourselves in our loneliest moments, these obsessive trinkets in our minds are hence to me questionably beautiful.

By working in print and charcoal the mediums both call out for their obsessive nature, I hope to give homage to the obsession of memory. My work envisions idealised spaces such as those seen in photographs but also ones we let evolve in memoriam. The sickly sweetness of these fermented moments reverberate over time to the point that they appear beautiful, yet unrecognizable; alien extensions of ourselves.