Interview: Simone Rosti on The Palette Pages

“The Palette Pages is thrilled to introduce the art and interview by Art-Rooms selected artist Simone Rosti

Self taught or art school?

Self taught

If you could own one work of art what would it be?

An artwork of Maurizio Cattelan, it’s not important which one.

How would you describe your style?

I think to be a “not” photographer in the usual sense of the term, but an artist who uses the photography as a painter uses a brush or as a writer uses the word. Essentially, I think I am a conceptual artist who uses photography.

It was not easy to make others understand my art. Sometimes I have been considered as questionable technical photographer. Sometimes a photographer monothematic …The truth is that I do not care about the result and aesthetics of my work. I simply capture fragments of reality and I emphasize them up to the state of mind where I am. The results are my artworks with their imperfections, their misunderstandings, their incompleteness: our life. I never conceived shooting as a technical exercise where everything was balanced in search of perfection. Simply it was not my purpose. Conversely I found in imperfection and movement the key to my expression.

I think my art is very original, distinctive and identifiable. It is not common among photographers artists who often transit over in many areas with the risk to lose the fil rouge of their thought. I chose to stay in well-defined areas in favor of coherence; maybe in the future I could stop to produce artworks and I will focus on writing…The artist who recycles himself, selling his product as an object of consumption, does not interest me.

I am intrigued by essence and absence. I shoot through rapid movement of scenery: this is the starting point for subtraction, exasperation of contrast and scarification of the image until nothing but essence is left, an intimate and hidden projection of Self, an outstretched hand toward the viewer.”

Read full interview on thepalettepages.com

Interview: Chris Horner on The Palette Pages

” Over the next few weeks The Palette Pages will be featuring interviews with artists selected for Artrooms.  Set within the elegance and glamour of the Meliá White House, ARTROOMS is an interactive showcase of today’s most thought-provoking, mind-bending and awe-inspiring artists, carefully selected from across the globe by a panel of leading industry experts, art critics and buyers. Selected artists are invited to exhibit for free. This is London’s unique opportunity to come and scout art news and trends from all over the world.

We are delighted to introduce the art of Chris Horner.

Self taught or art school?

My art practice has developed through a continuous programme of learning. This started at a very young age from when I was at state school all the way through to my current status where I am studying for my Masters in Fine Art at the University Creative Arts. This regime of learning only increases your own individual capacity for art learning art practically and contextually.

If you could own one work of art what would it be?

A very challenging question to answer as there are many artworks which I appreciate but if I did have to choose one it would be, Francis Bacon’s   Three  studies for Figures at the base of a Crucifixion, 1944, Oil and Pastel on Sundeala board. The reason for this choice is number one Bacon has always been my most favorite painter, as for me he is in a class of his own, many artists have tried to capitalize on what he achieved but all have failed. The Crucifixion displays a grotesque horror which not only plays on the mind temporarily, it remains stored in ones mind,  this for me is how powerful the piece is. Bacon’s intelligence to construct and narrate images is incredible, forms become represented in space which is both positive and negative, which expresses real emotion, making one read the work  in an equal beautiful and sinister stance.

How would you describe your style?

My art practice is quite complex because I work with the subconscious, the process which I have invented is sourced through directions and rules, these carry an element of chance which makes the whole creative journey an unknown experience. I find working like this most interesting and exciting because the work constantly carries a freshness. I find myself as an artist becoming unaware of what is materializing when the work is in process, I include and remove myself all the time. For example I am first included during the selection of materials, then I am removed  when the materials collide with one another during the transformation process, but then I am back in the frame, when I investigate this  change and shift in surface. I record, document and highlight this conversion through mapping out the reformed surface though an obsessive ritualized action. This requires much patience and can be very challenging as it really is an endurance test. The adventure consistently changing and shifting, not just through the means of surface and material but the thoughts which surround me, this only settles once the process has been completed and all record of data filed. (…)”

Read full interview on thepalettepages.com